Leadership – All Saints’

We are in the 4th week of Ordinary Time in the Church’s Liturgical Calendar.

The Liturgical colour is green, as we are in Ordinary Time.

The Word of the Week this week is…

Leadership

Leadership is about serving others and inspiring a difference in the world. It is about being a witness to your faith and presenting yourself as a role model for others so they can grow in their faith too. Think about the ways that you serve and lead others. Give thanks to God for your leadership qualities and for all those in your lives who lead and guide you on your journey.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

The Word of the Week this week is…Leadership.

Leadership is about serving others and inspiring a difference in the world. It is about being a witness to your faith and presenting yourself as a role model for others so they can grow in their faith too. Think about the ways that you serve and lead others. Give thanks to God for your leadership qualities and for all those in your lives who lead and guide you on your journey.

In Matthew 20:25-28, Jesus tells His disciples that leaders should not exercise authority over people. Instead, whoever wants to become great must lower himself to be a servant. Leaders realize that serving others is the only way to lead with a pure heart, free of pride and arrogance.

Leaders should also care more about the people they lead than about their own power or ambition.

Discuss these questions:

What do you think makes a good leader? What other qualities do you think a leader should have? Who in your lives do you consider to be a good leader and why?

List the qualities around your form board, to remind yourselves to aspire to these qualities and virtues.  Remind yourselves each day to look for, live out and celebrate these when put into action, in both yourselves and in others.

Let us pray:

Lord,

Guide all in the world who have any type of power to use their power wisely and justly.

Enable us to be servant leaders who follow Jesus’ example, putting the needs of others ahead of our own needs, leading with humility and a pure heart.

Strengthen leaders in the Church and the world to bring peace and to promote love, equality and justice.

Help us to work as one family, respecting those who lead and guide us to do your will and to help your kingdom come.

Amen

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

For any leader, the qualities we generated yesterday in our forms are important to develop.  These should ensure that we are working on qualities that develop ‘self’ in a selfless, rather than selfish way.
 
In St. Peter’s letter, he reminds us that being virtuous is vital for entering God’s kingdom and that the way we act in this world should not be driven by selfish ambition, as echoed by St. Paul’s letter to the Philippians on our desktops this week.
 
Let’s read the two pieces of scripture, then learn more about the virtues we should practise and develop in life, to both live good lives and to have a chance at being a good leader:
A reading from St. Paul’s letter to the Philippians (2:3).
Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves.
The Word of the Lord Thanks be to God.
A reading from the Second Letter of St. Peter (2 Peter 1:3-10)
His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence, by which he has granted to us his precious and very great promises, so that through them you may become partakers of the divine nature, having escaped from the corruption that is in the world because of sinful desire. For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, and virtue with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness, and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love. For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. For whoever lacks these qualities is so short-sighted that he is blind, having forgotten that he was cleansed from his former sins. Therefore, brothers, be all the more diligent to make your calling and election sure, for if you practise these qualities you will never fall.
The Word of the Lord Thanks be to God.

Let’s learn more about what the Church teaches on the ‘virtues’ referred to in these letters:

Let us pray the Serenity Prayer, a prayer that asks God to grant acceptance, courage, and wisdom for things in our life we can’t control and to bring peace and calmness into our lives, in all that we do, which applies to us as people and as leaders:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
the courage to change the things I can,
and the wisdom to know the difference.
Amen

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Looking at leadership and the qualities and virtues required to be a leader of the Faith, it’s perfect timing that Wednesday is the feast of Saint John Bosco.

On January 31st, we honour Saint John “Don” Bosco, the founder of the Salesian order, and commemorate Don Bosco’s Feast Day.

He was a humble, selfless servant of God who was able to see true human potential in even the most hopeless situations. By dedicating his vocation to fostering that potential, he helped thousands of unemployed, impoverished and vulnerable youth believe in themselves again—and turn their lives around. 

St. John Bosco is a patron saint of editors, publishers, youth, apprentices, and magicians. 

 

As a person devoted to Our Lady, let us pray together on his feast day, to honour St. John Bosco and Our Lady:

Hail Mary, full of grace,
the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou amongst women
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death.
Amen.

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Friday 2nd February is The Feast of The Presentation of the Lord.  

Forty days after Christmas, the Church celebrates the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord, an event that Luke recounts in chapter two of his Gospel. In the East, the celebration of this feast dates back to the 4th century. By the year 450, it was called The Feast of the Meeting of the Lord because Jesus enters the Temple and “meets” the priests, as well as Simeon and Anna, representatives of the people of God.  

Simeon and Anna are great role models to look to, as we end this week of ‘leadership’ as, despite their very old ages, they continue to be forward-thinking.  They continue to put their trust in God and in his promise and he never lets them down.  They inspire us to remain strong in our faith and never be swayed by things that happen in life, even if days, months and years pass by, since God has a clear plan for each one of us.

Around the middle of the 5th century, we know the feast was also celebrated in Rome. At a certain point, the blessing of candles was added to this feast to recall that Jesus is the “light to the gentiles”, which is why this feast is also sometimes referred to as Candlemas.

Let’s reflect on this Feast Day with The Mark 10 Mission and remember the light that shines in each one of us, enabling us all to lead and guide others.

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Be Inspirational