Journey – All Saints’

We are in the 5th week of Lent in the Church’s Liturgical Calendar

The Liturgical colour is Purple and the Word of the Week is…

Journey

Lent is a time of journeying with Jesus Christ. It is a time of reflecting on our lives, repenting our sins, and growing in our faith.

The journey of Lent is a challenging one, but it is also a rewarding one.

It is a journey that can help us to grow closer to God so that we are ready to truly celebrate Jesus Christ’s resurrection at Easter.

 

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

March 17th is a day we celebrate and remember St Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland. It is a special day for Hub of schools as some of you may have gone to St Patrick’s school! On Thursday/Friday last week we did a quiz all about St Patrick that our No to Hate Ambassadors created. If you haven’t done that yet, go back to last week’s resource to do it.

St Patrick is a man who teaches us a lot about looking at new and creative ways to draw closer to God and to remember his presence in our lives, especially at times when we struggle or feel challenged.  He teaches us how to pray for God’s presence in our lives too.

 

Here are a few facts about St Patrick.

Most likely from Great Britain, Patrick was kidnapped by Irish pirates when he was a teenager. In Ireland, which was a pagan country at the time, Patrick was enslaved as a shepherd for six years. While he endured cold and hunger, he turned to God and prayed unceasingly. According to his autobiography, St. Patrick prayed one hundred prayers every day, which helped him to forget his suffering.

Eventually, Patrick escaped from Ireland. Upon returning home, he studied to become a priest, and he was ordained a bishop when he was 43. Patrick had an unshakable desire to bring the Gospel to his brothers and sisters in Christ in Ireland. He didn’t move on and forget all about Ireland after his liberation. Instead, he acted on God’s call to return and evangelize.

As Patrick responded to this call to holiness and action, he converted countless people, ordained priests, and established dioceses in Ireland. He’s known for using the image of a shamrock to explain the mystery of the holy trinity. The three leaves of a shamrock represent the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, but the stem that they share reminds us that they’re one.

 

Reflection:

The hardships that we face are meant to strengthen us. During our suffering and struggles, we should look outside of ourselves and seek God as St. Patrick did. As we grow closer to Him, we receive his grace and learn the reason behind our suffering. When we lean on the Lord, He doesn’t excuse us from our suffering, but He makes it redemptive for us and for others. If St. Patrick had never gone to Ireland and encountered its people, he wouldn’t have been able to spread the Good News.  St. Patrick’s suffering was necessary not only for his own sanctification, but also for the salvation of an entire nation.  Right now, nations throughout the world are suffering.  Like St. Patrick, we can turn towards God and pray for those affected by suffering, as well as doing little acts of Lenten service/almsgiving for our neighbours, so that we respond to God’s call to action, like St Patrick did.

Christ is Always With Us – St Patrick’s Prayer

The Breastplate is a prayer by St. Patrick which helps us to deepen our trust in God.  It reminds us that Christ always surrounds us.

We should remember His constant presence especially in difficult moments, as it reminds us that Christ is always beside each one of us and working within us.

Let us pray this part of the prayer together now:

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of everyone who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

Amen

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

This week, we journey, as a Church, through the final weeks of Lent.  As part of our prayer journey, we join the Church in praying on and reflecting on the prayer that Jesus gave to his friends.  It is sometimes called the ‘family prayer of the Church’, since it teaches us how to live in the ways that Jesus called us to, as one family of God.

Each day, we will take a line of this special prayer and spend a few moments thinking about their meaning and about the ways that we can see these words in action in our daily lives.

Our Father…

Think of those words.

We call God, Our Father, as he leads and guides us as a parent does, to grow in faith and truth and to do what is right.  He shows us the way, feeds and guides us with his Word and walks alongside us each day.

Think for a moment…

How do you show reverence for God, ‘Our Father’, each day?

How do you speak to him?

How do you honour him?

How do you open your heart and mind to him?

Think about what you can do today to show honour and respect to God, Our Father.

There are lots of musical interpretations that reflect on the words of this beautiful prayer.  As today’s music plays, consider ways that you can be more open to listening to God’s word and to the teachings and message of God Our Father.

Jot your reflections onto your whiteboards.  Listen to him, as he speaks to you.

(Tutors, please play today’s music for as long as you need for this time of reflection:)

Let us pray:

Our Father,

Who art in Heaven,

hallowed be Thy name;

Thy Kingdom come,

Thy will be done

on earth as it is in Heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread;

and forgive us our trespasses

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Amen.

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

This week, we journey, as a Church, through the final weeks of Lent.  As part of our prayer journey, we join the Church in praying on and reflecting on the prayer that Jesus gave to his friends.  It is sometimes called the ‘family prayer of the Church’, since it teaches us how to live in the ways that Jesus called us to, as one family of God.

Each day, we will take a line of this special prayer and spend a few moments thinking about their meaning and about the ways that we can see these words in action in our daily lives.

Today, we focus on the ways that we keep God’s name holy.

It’s so easy in this world to use God’s name without reverence and respect.  We are called to challenge this and to retain the reverence of God’s holy name.

Think of times when God’s name is called upon…

in prayer in celebration in suffering in times of trauma or disaster in daily tasks in Sacraments in Mass in thanksgiving

There are so many more times when we call upon the presence of or intercession of God, to walk more closely with us on our journeys.

Share some times as a form now when you might call upon God or speak his name…

 

Let us remember that in these times and in life in general, each day, we are called to honour God’s name and to keep it holy.

Let us pray:

Our Father,

Who art in Heaven,

hallowed be Thy name;

Thy Kingdom come,

Thy will be done

on earth as it is in Heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread;

and forgive us our trespasses

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Amen.

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Choose someone in your form to lead your prayer this morning. They should read anything in bold, and everyone else should join in on the other parts.

We begin our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

This week, we journey, as a Church, through the final weeks of Lent.  As part of our prayer journey, we join the Church in praying on and reflecting on the prayer that Jesus gave to his friends.  It is sometimes called the ‘family prayer of the Church’, since it teaches us how to live in the ways that Jesus called us to, as one family of God.

Each day, we will take a line of this special prayer and spend a few moments thinking about their meaning and about the ways that we can see these words in action in our daily lives.

Today, we think about the ways in which we bring God’s kingdom to Earth.  

When you imagine the kingdom of heaven, what does it look like to you?

Perhaps it’s idyllic? 

Perhaps it’s filled with celebration, happiness, fun, peace and love?

How can we mirror elements of this ideal on Earth?

How can we bring peace, love, harmony, forgiveness, everlasting love…to Earth each day?

As children of God, we are called to bring the kingdom. 

We are called to strive for justice by standing up against injustice.

We are called to spread love and fight against war and hatred.

As the music plays, use your whiteboards to reflect on other ways that we can bring God’s kingdom to Earth.

Let us pray:

Our Father,

Who art in Heaven,

hallowed be Thy name;

Thy Kingdom come,

Thy will be done

on earth as it is in Heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread;

and forgive us our trespasses

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Amen.

We end our prayer with the Sign of the Cross. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Be Inspirational